How to become a sustainable non-profit organization

This presentation investigates the meaning of “financial sustainability” and why non-profit organizations are feeling the pressure to become “sustainable”. It also highlights the importance of getting stakeholders to embrace these changes that are sweeping through South Africa’s non-profit sector, and the risks of not doing this properly.

The presentation shares 12 practical shifts or tactics that I’ve seen non-profit organizations use to improve their financial sustainability. The presentation ends with an outline of how you can develop your own sustainability strategy.

I developed this presentation for a “masterclass” on financial sustainability that I facilitated on 1 December 2017. This formed part of the Drivers of Change Awards, which were hosted by the Southern Africa Trust.

How does your personality determine the best legal form for your social enterprise?

This presentation explores how a social entrepreneur’s personality (and preferred business model) strongly influences the type of legal structure that best suits their social enterprise. It contains the types of challenges that social entrepreneurs bring to my consulting practice. It includes 14 personality questions that entrepreneurs need to answer in order to make the best choice for themselves.

This presentation was first given at the Pathways to Funding Do-ference on 28 September 2017. This event was organized by the Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the University of Cape Town.

Social enterprises in South Africa: don’t let legal forms get in the way

Social enterprises are rapidly emerging in South Africa. However, many social entrepreneurs find themselves confused about which legal form to adopt and the flexibility of their current legal form. Too often, entrepreneurs receive bad advice and create unnecessary complexity for themselves.

This presentation clears up 10 common confusions about legal forms for social enterprises in South Africa. It also shares six income tactics that social enterprises can pursue, regardless of their legal form.

This presentation was first given on 16 September 2016 at the Pathways to Funding Do-ference by the Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship. It is based upon the many requests I receive each week for clarity on this topic.

Journey to social enterprise

Social enterprises do not magically appear. They are the result of many years of hard work. The good news is that thousands of South African organizations have set out on their journey to become social enterprises.

This presentation describes the Journey to Social Enterprise. It is based on 20 years of observation and consulting to aspiring social enterprises.

It describes how non-profit organizations and businesses can move towards a state of social enterprise. It unpacks and names the strategic transition points that organizations need to overcome when moving towards social enterprise. It also describes the specific skills that organizations need to master at each transition point.

Social enterprise – implications for South Africa’s non-profit sector

The South African Accounting Academy runs an annual conference for non-profit organizations (“NPO Conference”). I was invited to speak in the May 2016 conference on one of my favorite topics. Here is the presentation I gave.

This presentation explores the pros and cons of the traditional charity model versus the social enterprise model. It explains why the golden age of non-profit funding is over. It emphasizes the importance of adopting either the business model or mindset of a social enterprise. The presentation also reveals some of the challenges that non-profit organizations will experience on their Journey to Social Enterprise.

Introduction to social enterprises in South Africa

The Graduate School of Business at UCT runs a Post-Graduate Diploma in Management Practice. It contains a module on Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship. I gave a series of lectures in May 2016 to students, including this short Introduction to Social Enterprises in South Africa.

This short presentation explores a definition of “social enterprise” and examines some of the challenges they experience in South Africa.

101 on social enterprises

UCT Upstarts is a campaign to get students to start projects to have a social impact. I was invited to present a “101 course” on social enterprises in May 2015. This presentation introduces the concept of a social enterprise and highlights the three main challenges they are experiencing: access to markets; access to business support; and access to finance.

Business models for social entrepreneurs

The Graduate School of Business at UCT runs a post-graduate diploma in Management Practice. This diploma contains a module on Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship. I gave a series of lectures in February 2015 to students on the different business models that social entrepreneurs have been using in South Africa.

The presentation draws inspiration from two sources. The first is the Harvard Business Review article entitled “Reinventing your Business Model”. The second source is Kim Alter’s classic 2007 paper entitled “Social Enterprise Typology”.

Think like a social enterprise

It is my current view that social enterprise is both a business model and a paradigm or way of thinking. While the social enterprise business model is only suitable for some organizations, I believe that almost all organizations with a social agenda can benefit from embracing the mind-set of a social enterprise.

This presentation from June 2014 introduces the 10 key components of the social enterprise mind-set. It was first presented at a conference for non-profit organizations hosted by the City of Cape Town.

How to apply social enterprise thinking to your business

Traditional businesses and non-profit organizations can both start the journey to become a social enterprise. This presentation discusses 10 things that businesses can do in order to embrace social enterprise thinking and expand their social impact.

It was first presented in June 2013 as part of the SAB Foundation’s enterprise development programme.

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